As part of CREATE’s goal to promote and strengthen Lafayette’s creative assets, a process has been launched to develop a thorough and usable asset inventory. The final product of this exercise will result in a tool that can be used to educate residents and visitors about existing assets and better connect users, audiences, and businesses for cross-sector development.
To continue the initial research, we are asking you to help identify some of Lafayette's most important, or potentially underrepresented, cultural assets by filling out the asset categories below.
Please include as many examples (specific names) as you can and separate each by using a comma. We encourage you to be as inclusive as possible, and if you think something might be on the fence of what counts as an asset - please include!
What is a cultural asset?
In every community that manages to sustain or revive itself over time, there are cultural factors that contribute to the vitality and robustness of the people living there. These factors are shared and creative, which is to say they are cultural and they are assets that make life valuable, that make life worth living. These cultural assets can be material, immaterial, emotional, or even spiritual. They can be 'solid' things like concert halls, galleries, gardens, parklands and stadiums. They can be special tracts of the natural environment which encourage particular types of cultural activities. Or the climate itself might be a cultural asset if it encourages special kinds of creative and communal activities that bind people together in a place over time. Stories too might be cultural assets if they are attached to particular peoples and places if they are powerful enough to encourage people to care about and care for their place. In these stories, values can circulate, and special memories often reside in particular locations mentioned in the tales. Thus the places mentioned in the stories can be regarded as cultural assets if people tell of these places and visit them regularly and develop regular practices or rituals or ceremonies to care for them.
-Professor Ross Gibson, Sydney College for the Arts

 

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